Photography Tours

One-to-one and small group photography tours and workshops in Dublin and across Ireland.

Expert Guidance

Guidance, tuition and critique on your images and workflow before, during and after your tour or workshop.

Photography Workshops

Learn to make better images, learn new techniques and enjoy the challenge with our one-to-one photography workshops.

See Ireland with a Creative Eye

From the chief city on the island to the charming mediaeval gem that is Kilkenny City to the stunning geological landscapes of Northern Ireland's Antrim Coast or the lesser visited South Armagh. Contact Panoramic Ireland today to arrange a personalised tour and photography workshop anywhere in Ireland.

What Is A Photo Tour?

What is a photo tour and is it different to a photography workshop? This is a question we get asked a lot. There is no real difference but simply, a tour is more focused on seeing the place with a photographic emphasis while a workshop is specifically designed to concentrate on one or more aspects of your photographic technique, equipment or composition. Both tour and workshop are interchangeable and there is a degree of overlap.

Because we tailor each tour to suit your needs, we choose the appropriate locations and times to maximise your time in Ireland and help you to improve your photography.

If you would like to know more about our photography workshops in Ireland please contact us here and join an Irish photographer for a day in your favourite part of Ireland.

Don't forget that we offer Gift Vouchers for Christmas and all year round for birthdays and other occasions. A photography gift voucher entitles the holder to the same benefits as a direct booking: one-to-one photography tuition, a choice of locations in Dublin, Wicklow and the rest of Ireland, morning or evening photography workshops, follow-on advice and critique on images. To buy a Panoramic Ireland Photography Gift Voucher for a friend, relation or even for yourself please follow this link or Contact Us.

Find out more about our Dublin Photo Tours here, for our Northern Ireland photo tours click here and Galway and rest of Ireland you can find out more here.

What makes Ireland so special? Perhaps it is the landscapes, the history, the people or a combination of all of these that bring 7 million visitors every year to this little island.

Dublin is the capital of Ireland and the chief city on the island, Belfast is the second largest, and the chief city of Northern Ireland. The island has two currencies and two governments but there no border controls between the north and south; indeed it is quite easy to drive from one side to the other without knowing it.

It is true, in Ireland it rains a bit (isn't that why it's so green?) but don't let that put you off because it doesn't rain as much as you think. With some good luck there will be fine weather during your visit. The best months to visit are April, May, June and September. The days are long, the weather is often perfect and it isn't high season. Is there any better place to be than driving along a country road somewhere in Ireland on a warm, sunny day?

Ireland makes a perfect location to improve your photography or to enhance your image collection. Contact us today to learn more about our bespoke tour options.

Image of the Week

June 15th 2020

This week's image of the week comes from the Wild Atlantic Way, a stormy sunset scene of oranges and black as evening and rainfall close in on the Atlantic Ocean off Ireland's west coast, the Sun's rays providing drama.

With Coronavirus hitting large gatherings, and Ireland reopening at the end of June 2020 why not take one of Panoramic Ireland's private photography tours in Ireland - perfect for avoiding the large crowds. Bookable now for 29th June onwards.

Find out more by going to the Contact page.

Read More Here

Seven Essential Places to Photograph in Ireland

  1. Dublin - home to Guinness, Croke Park and The Book of Kells; you can't miss Dublin, a city that has improved over the past 10 years.
  2. Wicklow - mountainous and empty yet less than an hour from Dublin, Wicklow is home to the most famous hermitage in Ireland at Glendalough.
  3. Belfast & the Antrim Coast - the land of myths and legends, saints and scholars, how things have changed in 'The North' and for the better. The stunning landscapes are now easy for all to see. Game of Thrones has added to that appeal.
  4. Dingle - the furthest west that you can get in Ireland, and a peninsula that has as more pubs than you could ever visit. Visually stunning.
  5. The Burren - a unique geological landscape, The Burren is home to arctic, alpine and mediterranean plants.
  6. Connemara - rugged and wild, full of bogs, sea and sky as well as a few ponies of distinction.
  7. Donegal - the most northerly county in Ireland, the Atlantic coastline is second to none in Ireland with the sea cliffs of Slieve League and miles-long sandy beaches.

Have a look at the blog section of the site for more stories, events and information on the places mentioned here.

Enjoy the site, we hope you learn something and when you come to visit us here in Ireland/ Why not book a photography tour with us, learn something about the real Ireland and learn how to make better images.

LATEST POSTS FROM OUR BLOG

  • Blue Hour - Early Morning Swim at Dublin's Forty Foot
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    Blue Hour - Early Morning Swim at Dublin's Forty Foot

    Dublin's Forty Foot is one of the most famous swimming spots in Ireland, and possibly the world.

    With recent visitors including Matt Damon, Loudon Wainwright III and of course me, the Forty or 40-Foot also featured in James Joyce's Ulysses.

    I have of course written here on Panoramic Ireland about the 40-foot, where I mentioned that the water is definitely not 40 feet deep. The name of the small coastal area in Sandycove comes from the 40th Regiment of Foot, a regiment of the British Army that were stationed here.

    Written on Saturday, 19 September 2020 22:58 in Guide Read more...
  • Bective Abbey, County Meath
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    Bective Abbey, County Meath

    I wrote recently about the production of a new film, postponed during the Coronavirus / COVID-19 pandemic, set to be filmed this month at Cahir Castle, County Tipperary. Some of The Last Duel, starring Matt Damon, Adam Driver, Ben Affleck and Jodie Comer and directed by Ridley Scott is also being filmed at one of the finest scenic locations in County Meath, Bective Abbey.

    Bective Abbey is a former Cistercian Abbey dating to 1147 by a local king as a daughter house to Mellifont Abbey, in nearby County Louth. It was in use until the mid 16th century when it was destroyed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries by Henry VIII. It was subsequently used as a private house and is now in state care.

    Filming of The Last Duel takes place in September and October 2020.

    Bective remains one of my favourite locations to photograph. Seen here in the main image the ruins after dark, and below on a fine sunny day surrounded by lush green trees in summer.

    The ruins famously featured in another Hollywood film, Braveheart starring and directed by Mel Gibson. You'll remember that scene where the chap gets thrown out of the window, that's Bective.

    Join me on a photography workshop to photograph the fine sights of Ireland, beyond Dublin - email address at the top of the page.

    Ruins of Bective Abbey, County Meath - Ireland

    Ruins of Bective Abbey, County Meath - Ireland

    Atmospheric Ruins of Bective Abbey, County Meath - Ireland
    Atmospheric Ruins of Bective Abbey, County Meath - Ireland
    Written on Tuesday, 15 September 2020 21:45 in Guide
  • Coronavirus / COVID-19 Update - Ireland September 2020
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    Coronavirus / COVID-19 Update - Ireland September 2020

    As of September 10th 2020, Ireland still remains the most difficult country in Europe to get into and out of.

    International travel is currently still possible but with a mandatory 14 day quarantine and no allowance made for negative tests, the number of visitors coming to Ireland has fallen significantly and the Irish government has asked Irish people not to travel for non-essential reasons such as for holidays.

    Pubs in Ireland are currently still closed, except for those that can serve food - a substantial meal. And although a date has been set for the 21st of September, in the same breath members of the government were advising that this date might not be possible due to public health advice.

    Dublin and Limerick are experiencing large increases of cases, more so than the three counties of Laois, Offaly and Kildare that had restrictions of movement placed on them for several weeks in August.

    It seems like the Irish government are still working on a county by county basis rather than a municipal basis. Restricting movement at a town or district level would make much more sense for those who know Ireland.

    For instance, should an outbreak occur in Portumna, County Galway the current policy would involve restrictions on movement in the whole of that large county, Ireland's second largest. That means a 2.5-hour drive away in Clifden, there would also be restrictions yet in this majestic small town, pictured, nestled behind the Twelve Bens beside the Atlantic Ocean there may no increase, even a decrease in cases or none at all. To put this in context, Portumna is only a 2 hour 10 minutes drive from Dublin, the Irish capital and the same journey time to Cork.

    So it is obvious to many that a county by county basis is not a workable option for lockdowns or restrictions on movement in Ireland as schools and the economy, pubs and international travel reopens.

    What the Coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic has shown is that travel is certainly now more difficult even to standard, normal, safe destinations. It is possible to be faced with cancellations, delays and restrictions without warning.

    It's always worth having good travel insurance and never more important than now so check out this roundup of the best deals from Money.

    Indeed Matt Damon who is now filming The Last Duel in Cahir, County Tipperary remained in Ireland during the first lockdown in Spring 2020.

    Clifden, majestically nestled between the Twelve Bens and the Atlantic
    Clifden, majestically nestled between the Twelve Bens and the Atlantic in Connemara, County Galway
    Written on Thursday, 10 September 2020 14:15 in Guide
  • River Liffey, Dublin and the Church of the Immaculate Heart of Mary
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    River Liffey, Dublin and the Church of the Immaculate Heart of Mary

    Stormy day in Dublin, looking across the River Liffey towards the Church of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and the jigsaw building.

    A colourful day in the Irish capital, the River Liffey reflecting some of the colour of the sky and the quayside buildings.

    Written on Wednesday, 09 September 2020 00:00 in Guide Read more...
  • Croagh Patrick, Halfway - Close to Sunset on the Mountain
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    Croagh Patrick, Halfway - Close to Sunset on the Mountain

    I wrote a few weeks ago about that magical moment on top of Croagh Patrick with a wide open panorama and brocken spectre - an atmospheric phenomenon.

    You can read about that here, this was on that same fine climb with the plains of Mayo spread out below, the long stony path leading up into the cloud line and the landscape that awaits beyond.

    For me photography is about capturing moments and creating a sense of place - Ireland really is my place, from the western landscapes to urban Dublin.

    And with my cancer journey over the past two years it has been places and moments like this that keeps spirits high, sometimes reminiscing and sometimes getting out into the countryside to photograph.

    Written on Thursday, 03 September 2020 22:14 in Guide Read more...

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