• Double Rainbow Over the Atlantic
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    Double Rainbow Over the Atlantic

    Stormy day spray off the sea brings a fine double rainbow that extends below the horizon.

    Little is visible of the scenes beyond, the rugged Irish coastline extending beyond into the distance.

    But the presence of a double rainbow, seemingly floating in the view offshore, is enough to make the rainy afternoon worthy of exploring with camera especially with that little glint of light - the hope of brighter weather to come.

    Written on Sunday, 02 August 2020 00:46 in Photo Tours
  • Night, and the Storm Closes in Over the Sea from Moyle
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    Night, and the Storm Closes in Over the Sea from Moyle

    A storm rolls in from the northwest, across the North Atlantic towards the Sea of Moyle and in the distance the islands of the west of Scotland - Islay and Jura amongst others.

    In the foreground sits Rathlin Island, one of the largest islands off the coast of Ireland.

    The last warm colour of the evening's daylight fades as deep cloud fills the sky and rain obscures the horizon.

    The Sea of Moyle sits between the northern part of Antrim, known as Moyle and stretches across to Scotland at the Mull of Kintyre. It forms part of the North Channel, that part of the Irish Sea north of the Isle of Man to the north coast of Northern Ireland, where the Irish Sea meets the open Atlantic again.

    Interestingly the North Channel was the scene of the first success by the United States Navy under the command of John Paul Jones and his ship the USS Ranger against the HMS Drake in 1778. A battle almost took place in Carrickfergus before both ships met again a few days later in the East Antrim town on the 24th of April. Jones and his reluctant crew, in it for the money but not glory, successfully defeated HMS Drake after blasting the sails and masts to slow it down. The British ship had superior numbers but was poorly crewed and its guns were not in good working order.

    John Paul Jones was from Scotland and along with Commodore John Barry from Wexford in Ireland is considered a founding father of the United States Navy.

    The Sea of Moyle, as seen in the above image, was the location of one of the three places where the Children of King Lir were banished to live as swans for 300-years by their evil stepmother - a famous story in Irish mythology.

    Join me, Panoramic Ireland, to photograph the scenes, seascapes and landscapes of the Antrim Coast, Wicklow, Galway and all points in between.

    Written on Saturday, 01 August 2020 22:27 in Guide
  • View From the Mountain, Croagh Patrick
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    View From the Mountain, Croagh Patrick

    I have written about Croagh Patrick many times here on Panoramic Ireland, most recently with the story of a brocken spectre panorama.

    And here is a view from the other side of this majestic peak situated out on the Atlantic Coast of County Mayo in Ireland's west.

    Written on Friday, 31 July 2020 23:20 in Guide Read more...
  • Croagh Patrick - a Brocken Spectre and Ringed Glory Panorama
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    Croagh Patrick - a Brocken Spectre and Ringed Glory Panorama

    Croagh Patrick Brocken Spectre and Ringed Glory

    Ireland is a magical place, many myths and legends abound of superheroic endeavours and mysterious peoples.

    That magic didn’t disappear centuries ago either, it still exists.

    Written on Sunday, 26 July 2020 21:11 in Guide Read more...
  • Searching for and Photographing Comet NEOWISE on a Cloudy Night in Ireland
    Written by

    International travel photographer and Irishman in search of the best bits of Ireland. Leading photography tours and experiences in Ireland.

    Contributor to New York Times / Sunday Times / Irish Times

    Cancer survivor.

    Ask me about Ireland or about photography in Ireland.

    Searching for and Photographing Comet NEOWISE on a Cloudy Night in Ireland

    With recent cloudy overnight weather it has been difficult to find an opportunity to get out and photograph Comet NEOWISE or C/2020 F3 (NEOWISE).

    The celestial body is now heading away from Earth and is fading, soon to disappear.

    So with a good evening sky and a forecast for clear skies I headed into the mountains.

    Photographing clouds and other scenes as I waited for the sky to darken, I was greeted about an hour after sunset with more and more cloud. Thickening all the while, I eventually lost sight of any open sky.

    As midnight approached, sunset was at 21:40 - I descended out of the mountains really with the intention of heading on, to abandon hope of photographing the comet.

    But as the altitude changed, so did my view of the sky - I could finally see some stars and the Plough became visible in the northern sky.

    I knew that NEOWISE would be close to the Plough and sure enough when I found a quiet crossroads in the Irish countryside I finally had a view of the whole sky.

    Surprised that I could just see it with the unaided eye, I quickly set about photographing the comet, first with a wideangle lens then with a longer lens.

    It burns a fine green at the moment, having been a red colour last week.

    And that might be the last time I have the opportunity to search for and photograph NEOWISE as the forecast for night skies over Ireland for the rest of July aren't wonderful. But, with the patience of a photographer I will have at least another attempt.

    Join Panoramic Ireland on a photography workshop or photo tour in Ireland.

    Comet NEOWISE over Ireland
    Comet NEOWISE over Ireland
    Written on Friday, 24 July 2020 12:11 in Guide

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